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Jobs for Diesel Technicians: On the Farm

Jobs for Diesel Technicians: On the Farm

Diesel mechanics are trained for working on more than just trucks—including farm equipment

Diesel power is critical on the farm. And not just for the trucks that transport fertilizer, tools, or other supplies—but for the growing, harvesting, processing, and packaging systems that put food on the table in households all across the country.

It’s hard to overstate the importance of the agricultural industry, and that industry relies on diesel technology.

And if you’re looking for a new career, enjoy working with your hands, and want to support farming, training to become a diesel mechanic or technician could be the perfect fit.

Farm equipment

Diesel technology isn’t just for big trucks or locomotives; it is also an integral power source for farming equipment and vehicles—and for the processing and packaging of food. It’s important to keep the agricultural products supply chain moving, and that diesel power relies on mechanics and technicians who are trained to install, maintain, and repair diesel farm equipment. That could mean working for equipment manufacturers and repairers, for major agricultural corporations, or even with individual farmers.

So if you’re passionate about supporting farmers and the country’s broader food industry, becoming a technician who works on diesel farm equipment could be a way to help ensure that tractors, irrigation systems, combines, and trucks continue to run smoothly.

Diesel tech

Diesel technicians and mechanics are trained to support critical diesel technology to help industries like transportation, manufacturing, and—of course—agriculture. Having the skills and hands-on knowhow to maintain and repair diesel systems is an important job!

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that nearly 14,000 jobs will be added nationwide between 2018 and 2028, meaning that diesel service technician and mechanic jobs are expected to grow about 5% during that period. Across a range of roles in diesel technology, technicians and mechanics earned annual median pay of $48,500—or hourly wages of more than $23 per hour—in 2019.

Do you think you have what it takes to install, maintain, and repair diesel systems in farming equipment and vehicles?

Take a look at our partner institution and sponsor of this blog post: Universal Technical Institute

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